From Resident Evil to Rohypnol

Teacher+Sean+McAndrews+creates+a+puff+of+fire+using+Lycopodium.+Lycopodium+Powder+is+yellow%2C+consisting+of+the+dry+spores+of+clubmoss+plants%3B+when+it+is+mixed+with+air%2C+the+spores+formed+are+highly+flammable+and+are+used+to+create+flashes+or+flames+as+theatrical+special+effects.+%E2%80%9CI%27ve+made+many+mistakes%2C+but+I%27ve+also+had+some+amazing+times+with+students.%E2%80%9D
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From Resident Evil to Rohypnol

Teacher Sean McAndrews creates a puff of fire using Lycopodium. Lycopodium Powder is yellow, consisting of the dry spores of clubmoss plants; when it is mixed with air, the spores formed are highly flammable and are used to create flashes or flames as theatrical special effects. “I've made many mistakes, but I've also had some amazing times with students.”

Teacher Sean McAndrews creates a puff of fire using Lycopodium. Lycopodium Powder is yellow, consisting of the dry spores of clubmoss plants; when it is mixed with air, the spores formed are highly flammable and are used to create flashes or flames as theatrical special effects. “I've made many mistakes, but I've also had some amazing times with students.”

Teacher Sean McAndrews creates a puff of fire using Lycopodium. Lycopodium Powder is yellow, consisting of the dry spores of clubmoss plants; when it is mixed with air, the spores formed are highly flammable and are used to create flashes or flames as theatrical special effects. “I've made many mistakes, but I've also had some amazing times with students.”

Teacher Sean McAndrews creates a puff of fire using Lycopodium. Lycopodium Powder is yellow, consisting of the dry spores of clubmoss plants; when it is mixed with air, the spores formed are highly flammable and are used to create flashes or flames as theatrical special effects. “I've made many mistakes, but I've also had some amazing times with students.”

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Ever wonder how a college student could go from playing games such as Resident Evil, Dungeons and Dragons, Fallout, and Exploding Kittens to mixing up complicated scientific compounds such as Carboxymethylcellulose, and Rohypnol.

New science teacher Sean McAndrews, father of two and grandfather of four, has done just that.

While McAndrews was a kid he played “all kinds of board games, and video games.” When he was little, McAndrews’ mother was a teacher though she quickly decided it was not the path for her. He McAndrews did have another relative in the teaching industry, his Great Aunt. He always heard stories about “long hours and frustrations” involved in teaching, though these stories were mingled with ones about “working with students and making a positive difference in people’s lives.”

McAndrews grew up in western Montana, spendingHe spent time as a kid in Troy, Missoula, and Kalispell. Many other teachers and scientists are from a similar area: Harold Urey, a nobel prize winner for chemistry; Norman Jeffaris Holter, a biophysicist who was awarded the Laufman-Greatbatch Prize; Loren Acton, a physicist and astronaut who flew on Space Shuttle mission STS-51-F; and, Maurice Hilleman, described by Robert Gallo as the “the most successful vaccinologist in history.” 

In college McAndrews sold men’s clothing and worked in a bookstore. After that he  continued to sell men’s clothing at a tuxedo shop in San Diego, Cali. In this job McAndrews was occasionally required to model a tux at a wedding fair. However, after a while McAndrews decided the job just wasn’t fit for him so he moved on to Tech Support with Hewlett Packard, known to most of us as HP. 

“It was initially a good job, and I worked my way up to a senior tech position and got asked to join the training program,” McAndrews said. After a while, however, McAndrews said the company was bought out and the new owners made the job miserable; the job now filled with stress, odd hours, and angry clients, so he  decided to move on and go back to school to teach.

McAndrews first started in a small school in Joliet, Mont. and climbed his way to Cody High School. Cody actually selected him as he was considering teaching in either Powell or Billings. 

McAndrews just finished his master’s degree as Montana State University. He doesn’t actually like school, and, in fact he only attended one school reunion. “I graduated and got out of there and I didn’t go back. Ever,” McAndrews said. McAndrews also makes the choice to attend college in the summers between terms of school. 

“Teaching is as much about learning as it is about teaching,” he said. Experience in a classroom is more meaningful than anything that can be found in a college textbook.

“I’m not really worried about being remembered at this point,” he said, “I’m just living and trying to be an interesting teacher.”