CHS Bonfire

Filed under Staff Editorials

New Consequences for CHS Protests

What are the consequences of No Change?

Students+Walkout+Against+Gun+Violence+%0AStudents+at+Roosevelt+High+School+in+Des+Moines+join+countless+peers+across+the+country+in+staging+a+school+walkout+to+protest+gun+violence.+The+event+featured+a+student+gospel+choir%2C+a+spoken+word+poet%2C+and+a+call+to+action+for+students+to+contact+their+elected+officials.
Back to Article
Back to Article

New Consequences for CHS Protests

Students Walkout Against Gun Violence 
Students at Roosevelt High School in Des Moines join countless peers across the country in staging a school walkout to protest gun violence. The event featured a student gospel choir, a spoken word poet, and a call to action for students to contact their elected officials.

Students Walkout Against Gun Violence Students at Roosevelt High School in Des Moines join countless peers across the country in staging a school walkout to protest gun violence. The event featured a student gospel choir, a spoken word poet, and a call to action for students to contact their elected officials.

Phil Roeder, Creative Commons

Students Walkout Against Gun Violence Students at Roosevelt High School in Des Moines join countless peers across the country in staging a school walkout to protest gun violence. The event featured a student gospel choir, a spoken word poet, and a call to action for students to contact their elected officials.

Phil Roeder, Creative Commons

Phil Roeder, Creative Commons

Students Walkout Against Gun Violence Students at Roosevelt High School in Des Moines join countless peers across the country in staging a school walkout to protest gun violence. The event featured a student gospel choir, a spoken word poet, and a call to action for students to contact their elected officials.

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The Cody School Board has decided that student protests will no longer be allowed on school property or during the school day. Superintendent Ray Schulte was quoted in the Cody Enterprise as saying, “They’re great students, as a whole they behave very well. I have faith the students will be fine. The request has been made, and I am confident they will honor that.”

While this may be true for some students, I believe that many students will continue to stand up for what they believe, regardless of consequences. Issues such as violence against school children are far too important for us to be silenced over a threat of a “consequence.”

The goal of our walkouts and protests is not to be disruptive, but to make a difference. If our demands of change make the people watching uncomfortable enough to talk, then we must be doing our job. It is impossible to make change without making noise. That doesn’t mean that our protests have been loud and obnoxious, but rather silent enough to be attention grabbing.

The Park 6 District can tell us that we are no longer allowed to protest on school grounds or during the school day, but that doesn’t mean we won’t. Change is not made by those who are compliant. Change is made by those who see a problem and refuse to back down until there is a resolution. For students who truly believe in their actions and demands, the thought of consequences means next to nothing. If you decide to punish us, it will only provide our movement with more attention and more traction.

When CHS was printing the Equus,  the motto of the paper was “Comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable.” That is the goal of our walkouts. So far, we have accomplished this little by little. Clearly, we have afflicted the comfortable, otherwise the school district and board would not feel the need to extinguish our voices and our demands for change.

Martin Luther King Jr. said, “Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.”

Clearly, the lives of students are already ending while they are in a “safe place,” and we cannot afford to remain silent. Whether or not the school district allows more walkouts and student protests, we will continue. We demand change, and regardless of the consequences we face, many of us will continue to fight.

 

3 Comments

3 Responses to “New Consequences for CHS Protests”

  1. Robin Berry on May 24th, 2018 3:23 pm

    I applaud that students wish to become involved in the community and in their school. The best way to do that is to study all sides of an issue, present constructive solutions and to do so in a written manner to those who can bring the solutions, if viable to fruition.
    Walking out of class is probably not the best representation of any of these goals. Classroom time is for learning. Involving yourself in solving community issues is to attend School Board meetings, City Council meetings, arranging forums in public areas when people can best attend; evenings and weekends. Talk with those whose opinions differ from your own to determine why you are approaching the solution from different avenues. Seek to find a common plank or method that you may both contribute to the actual solution to an actual problem. Often when researching solutions, you find that the problem has been misidentified or is not the problem that was presented and may require different paths to solving or rectifying the issue. ‘Change’ for the sake of ‘change’ is not a solution.
    The Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr believed in a day where all people would set aside their differences and live together in peace.

  2. Shannon on May 24th, 2018 4:36 pm

    Dr. King meant to bring attention to matters in order to get a seat at the table for negotiation through disruptive and uncomfortable actions. His letter from Birmingham jail (yeah, he went to jail for his actions, so was quite willing to face consequences), stated the following:

    “You may well ask: “Why direct action? Why sit ins, marches and so forth? Isn’t negotiation a better path?” You are quite right in calling for negotiation. Indeed, this is the very purpose of direct action. Nonviolent direct action seeks to create such a crisis and foster such a tension that a community which has constantly refused to negotiate is forced to confront the issue. It seeks so to dramatize the issue that it can no longer be ignored.”

  3. Benjamin Wambeke on September 12th, 2018 9:34 pm

    Great Response

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • New Consequences for CHS Protests

    Commentary

    So Many Smaller Endings

  • New Consequences for CHS Protests

    Staff Editorials

    Safety in Teen Relationships

  • New Consequences for CHS Protests

    Staff Editorials

    More Than Just a Homecoming Dance

  • New Consequences for CHS Protests

    Staff Editorials

    Cody High School Switches To Trimesters

  • New Consequences for CHS Protests

    News

    We Send Our Condolences to Star Valley

  • New Consequences for CHS Protests

    Arts & Entertainment

    The Collector: Disturbing, Intriguing, and Unreliable

  • New Consequences for CHS Protests

    Staff Editorials

    An Open Letter to School Trustee Weber

  • New Consequences for CHS Protests

    News

    Keep Protests to the Issue in Hand

  • New Consequences for CHS Protests

    Arts & Entertainment

    Miz Cracker: The Rightful Heir to the RPDR Season Ten Crown

  • New Consequences for CHS Protests

    Staff Editorials

    Speak My Piece

Navigate Right
The Student News Site of Cody High School
New Consequences for CHS Protests